Tree plantings, a sign the Kiwanis Centennial Park at Vulcan is nearing completion (photos)

Kiwanis Club of Birmingham
Kiwanis Club of Birmingham
Red maple tree planting at the Kiwanis Centennial Park at Vulcan, photo via Kiwanis Club of Birmingham

On Friday, the Kiwanis Centennial Park moved one step closer to completion with the planting of red maple trees along the trail entrance to the park..

“The trees are one of the final stages of construction before we open Kiwanis Centennial Park on March 20th,” stated Darcie Plowden, Director of Communications for the Kiwanis Club of Birmingham

Kiwanis Club of Birmingham is one of the oldest Kiwanis clubs in the world and it is the largest with over 550 members.

Plowden added, “Kiwanis Club of Birmingham celebrated their 100th anniversary in 2017.  As a gift to the community we are building Kiwanis Centennial Park at Vulcan.  It connects Vulcan with Southside and downtown as it was in the past.  It’s  a plaza, fountain, a two mile trail to Green Springs Highway and a light show on Vulcan.”

Here is a video of the tree planting:

Kiwanis has a long history with the park system in the city of Birmingham.   In the 1920s, the club hired the Olmstead brothers to design the city’s park system.  In the 30s Kiwanis led the effort to move Vulcan to his current spot on top of Red Mountain.

Also part of the Kiwanis Centennial Park at Vulcan is the restoration of the original Depression-era WPA steps. In the past this was this entrance to Vulcan until the park renovations in the 60s.

Vulcan park
Vulcan Park & Museum via -visitvulcan.com

“Our history with Vulcan is rich,” concluded Plowden.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.