There was another Bama Boom reported this morning

Birmingham

Birmingham

Did you hear it?  At approximately 7:30am this morning there was another loud “booming” sound that reverberated throughout North Central Alabama. Earlier this month in mid-November  there was a mysterious booming sound which Meteorlogist James Spann coined the “Bama Boom.”

Birmingham
James Spann on the far left, with the anchors at ABC 33/40, photo from Facebook

This morning Spann reported a second “boom” on Twitter and Facebook.

Spann’s tweet was followed up by a flurry of responses from the region, including one from the Jefferson County Emergency Management Agency.

 

Several residents throughout the region tweeted confirmation of the large “boom” in their neighborhood from English Village in Mountain Brook to as far north as Winston County.

 

The cause on the first “boom” in mid- November is  still a mystery.  Here was James Spann’s last update from earlier this month.

“Still not clear explanation for the “Bama Boom” that was heard … Most likely meteor/bolide or military aircraft. Meteor scientists and their colleagues at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville will do further analysis today to triangulate and better characterize the energy of the event, which may provide more clues…”

Did you hear the “boom”?    Bham Now will keep you updated when more information becomes available.

 

  • Author’s note: I heard a loud noise that shook my house  briefly at approximately 7:30 this morning too. It felt like a transformer had blown but the sound seemed far away. ~ Pat Byington

 

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.