Don’t forget to look for the Halloween full moon tonight and to “fall” back an hour in the morning

Pre-eclipse ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ Total Lunar Eclipse by David Frings

If you are out trick or treating tonight or just riding around looking at Halloween decorations, don’t forget to look for the first full moon on Halloween in 44 years.

According to the Farmer’s Almanac, the last full moon on Halloween occurred in 1944.

NASA tells us that after tonight, the next Halloween full moon will appear in 2039.

Blue Moon

Birmingham, lunar eclipse, moon
Photo by: Boris Datnow – Hoover, Alabama

Another fun fact. Tonight’s moon is a “blue moon.” That just happens to be the term scientists use to describe the 2nd full moon in a month. On October 1st there was a full moon. This phenomenon occurs about once every two and a years. 

Daylight Savings Time Ends Sunday Morning 

Halloween
Halloween decoration at The Preserve in Hoover. Photo via Pat Byington for Bham Now

When you are done making the Halloween rounds, make sure to “fall back” and set your clock back an hour.

The good news – tonight you get an extra hour of sleep. The bad news, it gets dark around 5:00 when you leave work on Monday evening. 

Another piece of interesting info – from my research on I found this little tidbit from the Chicago Sun-Times.

“According to a study led by a University of Colorado fellow in 2014, when Americans lose one hour of sleep in the spring, the risk of heart attack increases 25 percent. When the clock gives back that hour of sleep in the fall, the risk of heart attack decreases by 21 percent. (The limited study looked at hospital admission data in Michigan over a four-year period.)”

If this is true, I’m glad we are turning back the clocks tonight!

Be Safe

Be safe Birmingham this Halloween 2020. Keep your eyes out for the kids, look for the last Halloween full moon in 19 years and congrats on that extra hour of sleep!

While you are out tonight @tag your photos of the full moon on Bham Now’s social media platforms!


  • Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.