Hands On Birmingham is now United Way Hands On: Learn more about the new name, website and, volunteer opportunities

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United Way Hands On Volunteers working on a project in the Roebuck neighborhood in Birmingham. Photo courtesy of the United Way of Central Alabama

United Way of Central Alabama’s volunteer arm is rebranding.

Hands On Birmingham is changing its name to United Way Hands On.

Along with its new name, logo and rebranding effort, United Way Hands On is rolling out new services and an innovative volunteer platform that will connect more organizations to volunteers throughout the United Way of Central Alabama five-county area.

Why United Way Hands On?

United Way Hands On Volunteers working on a project in the Roebuck neighborhood in Birmingham. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

“Hands On Birmingham has been part of United Way for over a decade,” according to Benga Harrison, Director of United Way Hands On.

During that time, the number of volunteer projects and volunteers have expanded throughout the entire five-county United Way Central Alabama area.

“This rebrand is about two things,” said Drew Langloh, President and CEO of United Way of Central Alabama. “It shows United Way’s very tight connection to volunteerism. It also shows our broad geographical mission which covers our five-county region. The name change will help people recognize and see that we do volunteer projects not just in Birmingham, but also in the five-county footprint area of United Way.”

New Website – unitedwayhandson.org

In addition to the new name and logo, United Way Hands On has launched a new website, unitedwayhandson.org.

Langloh sees the new website as the “go-to” site for people seeking ways to volunteer and give back to their communities.

“We can now be the catalyst for groups that are looking to move the needle on important community issues. United Way Hands On will be the go-to website where individuals, groups, nonprofits, and businesses can track, share, and measure their progress.”

New Platform Makes it Easy to Volunteer

United Way Hands On Volunteers. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

Once volunteers discover the new United Way Hands On website, they can link to a platform named INVOLVE.

This new state of the art program has engagement tools for registration and searching for volunteer opportunities. INVOLVE is the next generation of volunteer engagement software.

Harrison provided an example of how INVOLVE works.

“INVOLVE helps lots of companies with their social responsibility programs. This program helps them keep track of the work and hours being done by their employees. It is a community-based platform.”

Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

Anyone can search and register for local volunteer opportunities and search for causes they care about. Their information is stored to review, manage memberships, track their hours, and share their experiences with others by posting comments and pictures. People can go on the site and not only volunteer for different projects, but they can also seek ways to volunteer for 150 different nonprofits in the five-county area.

Serving all five counties, not just Birmingham

One last benefit, rebranding and new services will deepen community engagement and volunteerism in United Way’s five-county area, which includes Jefferson, Shelby, Walker, Blount, and St. Clair Counties.

Volunteer Renaissance

United Way Hands On Volunteers working on a project in the Roebuck neighborhood in Birmingham. Photo courtesy of the United Way of Central Alabama

 

Bottomline, both Langloh and Harrison see the rebranding efforts and services ushering in a new era for volunteers throughout the region.

“Hands On is the place to go if you want to volunteer. It works with hundreds of organizations that have projects and relationships with thousands of volunteers. It is easy to sign up, and we will make it a really satisfying experience,” concluded Langloh.

Visit the new website, www.unitedwayhandson.org.

Sponsored by:

Birmingham, United Way of Central Alabama

  • Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.