Alabama Butterfly Atlas adds new “search by color” feature. Site includes eggs, caterpillars and more

Photo of a Summer Azure butterfly egg taken in 2017 by Sara Bright.

Sara Bright, Birmingham co-author and photographer of the book Butterflies of Alabama informed Bham Now this week that the Alabama Butterfly Atlas has added a new “search by color” feature on their popular nature website.

Photo of a Zebra Swallowtail egg courtesy of Sara Bright

Butterfly enthusiasts hope the new feature will make it easier for children and adults alike to better identify butterflies in their natural habitat by not requiring them to initially know the scientific or common names.

Birmingham Alabama
Diana Fritillary- photo by Sara Bright

What is the Alabama Butterfly Atlas

Birmingham Alabama
Zebra Swallowtail – photo by Sara Bright

Launched in April 2017, the Alabama Butterfly Atlas (ABA) collects, interprets, and shares information about Alabama’s butterfly populations for the purpose of education and conservation. It puts science-based information into the hands of those who need it—students and teachers, gardeners, conservationists, and green space planners across the state.

How to use the Atlas

Falcate Orangetip – photo from the Alabama Butterfly Atlas

If you want to learn everything there is to know about butterflies of Alabama, the Alabama Butterfly Atlas is a one stop shop.  The Atlas provides:

  • Access to life history accounts, distribution maps, photographs of each life cycle stage (the site also includes photos of eggs, caterpillars and chrysalis), host plant lists, gardening tips, and flight charts—all specific to Alabama.
  • Searchable information about a particular species or look at species lists from specific counties, regions, or selected public lands.
  • Info about the plants on which butterflies depend via the Alabama Plant Atlas (www.floraofalabama.org).

Citizen Scientists Welcomed

Birmingham
Great Purple Hairstreak – photo fro Alabama Butterfly Atlas

The Atlas welcomes public participation.

If you are a budding butterfly citizen scientist, photographer or just someone who loves “God’s stained glass windows” –  feel free to share your sightings and observations to albutterflyatlas@gmail.com. Click the “How to Submit” button for instructions.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.