ALDOT was not happy with I59/I20 contractor. Plans to reopen interstate Thursday before rush hour

Birmingham Malfunction Junction
Birmingham Malfunction Junction
Rendering of Malfunction Junction in Birmingham after ALDOT completes its bridge project. Graphic by ALDOT

Clearly, the Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) was not happy  earlier this week with the contractor in charge of the I59/I20 Bridge Replacement project, but it does look like the interstate will reopen before the Thursday morning Birmingham rush hour.

In a April 9 update on the recent closure of I-59/20 Southbound at I-65, ALDOT issued the following public apology to commuters and drivers.

The Alabama Department of Transportation apologizes to the commuters and drivers in Birmingham. We are very disappointed in the performance of our contractor on this job and we are currently fining them an average of $500,000 per day during this closure.

The good news, Bham Now spoke to  Linda Crockett, the media contact for ALDOT this Wednesday morning about the status of the interstate closure.

She  confirmed to us that ALDOT expects to reopen I-59/20 Southbound at  I-65 late Wednesday night or Thursday morning before rush hour, if construction goes smoothly today.

ALDOT, Birmingham, Alabama, bridge, I-20/59, traffic
via Equipment World

Check the ALDOT Updates

Before drivers make plans to travel through Birmingham on Thursday, we strongly suggest readers visit the ALDOT  59/20 Bridge on Facebook or Twitter and the Updates section of their website.

Let us hope construction goes well today so there will be no delays when folks travel to work Thursday morning.

 

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.