Birmingham: Don’t miss 2017’s only supermoon

Photo by: Boris Datnow – Hoover, Alabama

2017’s only supermoon is coming to Birmingham. Don’t miss it.

Last year in November, the moon was the closest full moon in 68 years, according to National Geographic.  Photographers and budding astronomers rushed outside to take photos.  Even Bham Now published a photo gallery  from our readers.

Supermoon sightings across Alabama and the South (slideshow)

What is a supermoon?

Tomorrow’s supermoon has been named the Full Cold Moon. According to Space.com it will appear up to 30 percent brighter and up to 14 percent larger than normal as the celestial body makes its closest pass to the Earth.

A supermoon occurs when a full moon coincides with the perigee of the moon’s orbital cycle. A perigee is the point at which the moon moves closest to Earth during orbit. Because the orbit is not a perfect circle, this means the moon typically sits anywhere between 252,000 and 226,000 miles from Earth. That is a difference of 26,000 miles—longer than the entire circumference of the Earth.

Photo by: Boris Datnow, Hoover, Alabama of last year’s supermoon

The moon will be completely full Sunday at 10:46 a.m. EST and reach its perigee, or closest point to Earth at 222,135 miles, 3:45 a.m. EST Monday.

Birmingham’s weather forecast

The weather forecast doesn’t look too bad for Birmingham on Sunday evening/Monday morning to see the supermoon.  As of right now, we are expecting partly cloudy skies and virtually no chance of rain.

Here is the hourly forecast.

Send Bham Now your photos

If the weather works out, Bham Now would love to “show off” your 2017 moon photos.  Last year we loved seeing photos from all over the South. We especially enjoyed iconic Birmingham and Alabama backdrops.

Send photos to hello@bhamnow.com

We look forward to seeing them!

 

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.