Birmingham Water Works to conduct major repair project on Hwy 280, tentatively starting Feb. 1st

Birmingham Water Works
Corner of Shades Mountain Filtration Treatment Plant on 280. (Pat Byington/Bham now)

Start MapQuesting alternative Highway 280 routes Birmingham.

Tentatively starting February 1st,  the Birmingham Water Works (BWW) will be conducting a major repair project on Highway 280 near the Shades Mountain Filtration Treatment Plant.

According to BWW, a 36-inch main infrastructure pipe has leaks in two sections passing through the Highway 280 right-of-way. 

The pipe is suspected to have begun leaking between two to three weeks ago near the time of record low temperatures.

The good news is that there is no danger to the water pressure or water quality for customers in the service area.

BWW and ALDOT Teaming Up

Birmingham
Highway 280 traffic. (Bham Now)

BWW is working in close collaboration with Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) officials to carefully plan the operation. 

Here is what to expect:

  • The repair project is expected to take up to 20 days 
  • The project will require one to two lanes of commuter traffic to be closed on Highway 280 eastbound adjacent to Rocky Ridge Road
  • Work will begin daily at 9 a.m. and end around 3:30 p.m. each day during the construction period.

During the construction project, water will be diverted back into the basin system to be used in the treatment process. 

“We know this will be an inconvenience to commuters during the February project,” says Birmingham Water Works Assistant General Manager Derrick Murphy. “We appreciate the close collaboration with ALDOT which is critical to minimizing the inconvenience and expediting of this challenging project.”

Stay Tuned

Expect more information to be shared and announced as the project planning develops, which includes traffic rerouting and logistical access to the affected water breaks.

Pat Byington
Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.

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