9 Children’s of Alabama programs ranked among the best in the nation by the U.S. News & World Report

Children's Hospital
Photo of Children’s of Alabama, by Pat Byington for Bham Now

When it comes down to ranking our nation’s colleges and hospitals, U.S. News and World Report is considered one of the finest evaluators. That’s why it’s big news when nine pediatric specialty services at Children’s of Alabama have been named among the nation’s best by the popular prestigious publication.

Nationally Ranked Programs

Birmingham
Photo via Facebook.

According to the recently released 2020-2021 report, Children’s ranked in the top 50 programs in the United States for:

  • Cancer
  • Cardiology & Heart Surgery
  • Gastroenterology & GI Surgery
  • Neonatology
  • Nephrology
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery
  • Orthopedics
  • Pulmonology
  • Urology

This is the 11th consecutive year that Children’s has been included in the rankings. 

Best Possible Care 

Children’s of Alabama CEO Mike Warren in 2019. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

“To be named among the leaders in pediatric healthcare in this country is a tremendous honor. It is a testament to the dedication of our physician partners at the UAB School of Medicine and each of our employees as well as to all of the families who trust us to provide the best possible care and treatment for their children,” said Children’s CEO and President Mike Warren.

Children’s and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Departments of Pediatrics and Surgery collaborated to submit the requested information. Children’s is the primary site for pediatric clinical and educational programs for the UAB School of Medicine. Children’s has provided specialized medical care for ill and injured children since 1911, offering inpatient and outpatient services throughout central Alabama.

“For the Heart Program to be ranked again is something we take a lot of pride in both at Children’s and at UAB. It’s really a testament to the people here and our constant drive to provide the best possible care for our patients,” added Dr. Yung Lau, division director, Pediatric Cardiology at Children’s

A Decade of Growth

Children's of Alabama
Staff and Volunteers made Halloween special for little pumpkin. Photo- Camerorn Balentine.

U.S. News introduced the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings in 2007 to help families of sick children find the best medical care available. Children’s and UAB began participating in the pediatric rankings in 2011. The rankings offer families an exclusive look at quality-related information at the individual hospital level.

Over the past decade Children’s has experienced tremendous growth.  In August 2012, the Benjamin Russell Hospital for Children opened to rave reviews. At a project cost of 

$400 million, the estimated square footage of the 12-story building exceeds 760,000 square feet, making it the largest medical facility expansion in the history of Alabama.

Other numbers:

  • Children’s provides care for youngsters from every county in Alabama, 42 other states and seven foreign countries 
  • Last year, there were more than 684,000 outpatient visits and more than 15,000 inpatient admissions
  • With more than 3.5 million square feet dedicated to pediatrics, Children’s is one of the largest pediatric medical facilities in the United States.

Read the Report

Children's Hospital
Children’s of Alabama. Photo by Bham Now

Want to see how well Children’s of Alabama measures up with Children Hospitals across the country?

Check out the complete listing and corresponding rankings for the magazine’s 2020-21 Best Children’s Hospitals online at https://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/pediatric-rankings.


  • Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.