See Birmingham’s stunning new “Rainbow Wall” in the heart of downtown (PHOTOS)

Birmingham’s Rainbow Wall volunteers paint the 500 foot mural on June 1-2, 2019. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

Color Bham has done it again.

Last year, the group led by Marcus Fetch organized dozens of volunteers to paint the Color me Birmingham mural near Innovation Depot.

Photo by Hannah Williams for Bham Now

This first weekend, they topped last year’s effort painting a 500 foot long Rainbow Wall on the side of the railroad tracks off Birmingham’s historic Morris Avenue between 22nd Street and 20th Street North.


Birmingham’s Rainbow Wall volunteers paint the 500 foot mural on June 1-2, 2019. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

Nearly 100 people volunteered on June 1-2.

The effort to paint the rainbow wall was funded by Kinetic founder Jay Brandrup, Shipt and neighboring businesses and residents.

“The goal of this wall is to carry on the theme of the Birmingham rainbow tunnels, as the Birmingham rainbow wall – to make it a landmark in town,” said Marcus Fetch. “We can imagine 1000s of photographers will use it over the years, kind of become a famous thing.”

Color Bham’s Marcus Fetch. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

Fetch was especially surprised by the turnout on Saturday morning when volunteers kept streaming in.


Birmingham’s Rainbow Wall volunteers paint the 500 foot mural on June 1-2, 2019. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

“It becomes really special for people,” Fetch added.  “They can claim they were a part of this. So like four years from now they can show a friend or family member a part of the wall – and say, WOW! – I was part of that. Give that sense of pride.  I really want to share that with everybody.”

Color Bham has plans to hold additional painting events big and small  – around the Magic City.  People can connect with Color Bham by joining their  Facebook page.

Color Bham’s Vision

Birmingham’s Rainbow Wall volunteers paint the 500 foot mural on June 1-2, 2019. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now

“I have this vision that 3-5  years from now the city can adopt the idea of a – “City of Color.” It can speak on re-defining our heritage. We are already known  as  a city of color along racial terms, so maybe we can also be known as a city of color for our  vibrance, art and diversity,” concluded Fetch.

 

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.