UAB’s Greg Harber has bicycled to work everyday since 2013. See how much money he saved

Greg Harber riding through Railroad Park. Photo from the Le Tour de Ham Facebook page

According to Commute Smart records, UAB employee Greg Harber bicycled or walked everyday to work and back home in 2018.  Since 2013, he has only driven a car twice to work.

A resident of Birmingham’s Highland Park neighborhood, Harber’s round trip commute is a little over 3 miles. A trip that takes only 10-15 minutes on his bicycle, over the course of a year, Harber has saved hundreds of dollars and reduced nearly 3 tons  pollution.

The numbers

What kind of impact does this short commute have on the environment and pocketbook?

Here is a copy of Harber’s documented numbers from Commute Smart:

Numbers that stand out:

Commuter savings since 2015 – $2994
Total Pollution reduced – 2.75 tons

One other hidden cost not listed is parking.  At UAB, the cost for a parking spot can range from a couple of hundred dollars to over $700 a year.

Birds singing

Greg Harber regularly takes photos of birds on his cycling trips. Photo from Le Tour de Ham

When he is not riding bike to work, many people know Greg Harber through the birding classes and workshops he teaches for Birmingham Audubon.  In fact, this year, Harber received the inaugural Yellowhammer Award from Birmingham Audubon, which recognizes members who have gone above and beyond to promote conservation and a greater knowledge of birds, their habitats, and the natural world.

“What I enjoy most about cycling to work each day is listening to the birds singing in my neighborhood,” said Harber.

“It also gives me an appreciation of the social justice and transportation equity issues facing Birmingham.”

New Year’s Resolution – Commute Smart

With 2019 approaching, one positive change you can make in the new year is to kick the “drive alone” habit.  Connect with Commute Smart and begin a carpool, join a  vanpool or actually get paid to walk or cycle to work.

Visit their website for details – HERE.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.