When will the Fall leaves start changing Birmingham? Wait a couple of weeks

Photo by Richard Byington for Bham Now

Record high temperatures throughout the Southeast in September, spilling into October (5 of the  first 6 days were over 88 degrees in Birmingham, including 4 – 90 plus days) are delaying leaves  from changing, according to the October 4, 2018 Foliage Report from the Foliage Network.

Here is their Southeast report:

The slow onset of color change continues throughout the region. The only locations showing any degree of color are those along the Appalachian Mountain chain. Color change there remains low (11% – 30% change), however. Unfortunately, temperatures will be on the rise again this weekend and that is not favorable for color change.

The Foliage Network Southeast leaf color chart for the coming week does not even reach into Alabama.

Cooler weather on the way

The good news.  It does look like Fall will finally arrive in Alabama later this week, with AccuWeather predicting  temperatures in the 70s beginning on Wednesday.

Snapshot of the weather forecast for Birmingham, Alabama from AccuWeather

Looking for a Fall Colors predictor map?

Since, Alabama’s leaf changing season may be off a week or two, here are some websites to help you get the most out of the colorful Fall season.

We have two websites that make the latest predictions on Fall Colors in the South. The first site is Smokeymountains.com .  This site, which of course focuses on the National Parks and public lands surrounding Smokey Mountain National Park, publishes a national 2018 Fall Foliage predictor map.

The second “go to” site is the Foliage Network.  The site’s weekly reports are short and concise, just enough info to help you in your search for colorful leaves in our region.

Alabama’s Fall Colors Trail

Photo by Richard Byington for Bham Now

In Alabama, if you  wanting to see the Fall Colors in all their glory, the Alabama Department of Tourism has produced a Fall Colors Trail.

Tourism has identified 12 North Alabama locations where you can see the Fall Colors at their best. In Birmingham that includes Oak Mountain State Park. Check out their website – HERE .

Don’t miss Alabama’s Fall Colors this month. Schedule an outing. Take a love one on a hike or drive.  I might be a week or two later than usual, but you won’t regret it.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.