Alabama Wildlife Federation Governor’s Conservation Awards honor Birmingham’s own Wendy Jackson and Wenonah High School

Alabama Wildlife Federation
Alabama Wildlife Federation
Wendy Jackson, second from the right next to Governor Kay Ivey receiving Conservationist of the Year award. Photo from Alabama Wildlife Federation Facebook page.

Earlier this month, several Birmingham conservation leaders were honored at the Alabama Wildlife Federation Governor’s Conservation Award banquet, including former longtime Freshwater Land Trust Executive Director Wendy Jackson and students from Wenonah High School.

The Alabama Wildlife Federation’s Governor’s Conservation Achievement Awards is considered the “Academy Awards” for conservation in the state. For over 40 years, the awards have been presented to individuals and organizations that make great contributions to the conservation of Alabama’s wildlife and related natural resources.

Here are the winners connected to the Birmingham region.

Wendy Jackson named Conservationist of the Year

Longtime Executive Director of the Freshwater Land Trust and now Executive Vice President of the Land Trust Alliance, Wendy Jackson, took home the Conservationist of the Year Award. Honoring a lifetime of accomplishments, Jackson, over two decades, led efforts establishing Red Mountain Park, Turkey Creek Nature Preserve, the Red Rock Trail System and countless projects throughout Central Alabama.

Wendy Jackson’s granddaughter meeting Governor Kay Ivey. Photo from Wendy Jackson’s Facebook page.

She is now a leader with the national Land Trust Alliance, one of the most respected conservation organizations in the nation.

Wenonah High School Litter Quitters – Youth Conservationist of the Year

The Wenonah High School Litter Quitters video about stopping litter and water pollution in the Village Creek watershed has garnered over 2400 views on YouTube. Earlier this year, the group’s video won the Valley Creek Cleanup Video Competition.

Here is the announcement about the winning video on ABC 33/40.

Here is the winning video

Other Birmingham Connected Winners

Jim Wadsworth, a longtime influential member of the Nature Conservancy in Alabama’s Board of Trustees, just recently flipped the switch on the largest solar powered gas station in Alabama in McCalla.

Jimmy and Sierra Stiles, Birmingham natives travel the state educating Alabamians of all ages about Alabama’s biodiversity.

Here is the entire list of the 2018 Governor’s Conservation Award winners.

Conservationist of the Year: Wendy Jackson, Birmingham
Wildlife Conservationist of the Year: Chuck Sykes, Montgomery
Fisheries Conservationist of the Year: Donald Alan Roach, Valley Grand
Forest Conservationist of the Year: Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn
Land Conservationist of the Year: Jim Wadsworth, Clanton
Water Conservationist of the Year: Ashley Campbell, Mobile

Wenonah High School Litter Quitters receiving the Youth Conservationist award

Air Conservationist of the Year: Shell Chemical L.P., Mobile
Conservation Educator of the Year: Hollie Terry, Marbury
Conservation Communicator of the Year: Jimmy & Sierra Stiles, Andalusia
Conservation Enforcement Officer of the Year: Officer Richard M. Tait, III, Camden
Legislative Conservationist of the Year: Senator Clyde Chambliss, Prattville; Senator Paul Sanford, Huntsville; Senator Bobby Singleton, Greensbor0
Judicial Conservationist of the Year: Adam B. Culbert, Guntersville
Hunter Safety Instructor of the Year: Tim Wooten, Mt. Olive
Youth Conservationist of the Year: Wenonah High School Litter Quitters, Birmingham

An impressive list. Congrats to all the winners. And most importantly, thank you for your efforts to protect Alabama’s natural heritage.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.