Mayor Randall Woodfin calls on residents to help ‘break the chain of silence’ by reaching out to the Crisis Center

Mayor Woodfin Birmingham
Mayor Woodfin Birmingham
Mayor Randall Woodfin greeting a visitor to the Warming Station at the BJCC on Christmas Day, 2017.

Yesterday, Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin took to social media calling on Birmingham residents to “…break the chain of silence” about mental illness and depression by reaching out to the Crisis Center in Birmingham.

His posts on Facebook and Twitter came after the high profile deaths this week of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain by suicide.

 


Woodfin also recognized in the posts the recent suicide deaths of Morehouse alum and prominent Centers for Disease Control researcher Timothy Cunningham and former Auburn football player Zach Gilbert.

Birmingham, Alabama, Crisis Center
One of many Crisis Center volunteers, via Crisis Center.

Last month, Bham Now’s Jen Daniel wrote about the Crisis Center’s service and how people can support their programs. Here is the link to that story:

Help the Crisis Center make more connections with those facing suicide, sexual assault and depression in Birmingham

Along with the general 24 hour hotline, the Crisis Center offers several numbers to assist specific areas of need. Below are the list of numbers:

If you are experiencing an emergency or have an immediate need, please call their 24 hour hotline at (205) 323-7777 or 1 (800) 273-8255.

Their directory:

Crisis Line: (205) 323-7777
Rape Response Line: (205) 323-7273
Teen Link: (205) 328-5465
Kid’s Help Line: (205) 328-5437
Senior Talk Line: (205) 328-8255

In the Bham Now article, this passage sums up the Crisis Center’s work.

“There is no stigma when it comes to mental health, only hope and healing for even the deepest wounds. For the Crisis Center, that means never turning anyone away. They are ready, willing and able to talk 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.”

It is good to see Mayor Woodfin using his office and bully pulpit to bring attention to these issues.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.