UAB ranks #191 out of 18,000 universities worldwide in the Center for World University Rankings

UAB researchers in Antarctica. Photo via UAB’s Facebook page.

UAB was ranked #191 in the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR), according to a UAB announcement on Twitter today.

Here is the tweet by UABNews:

The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) is a leading consulting organization that provides policy advice, strategic insights, and consulting services to governments and universities to improve educational and research outcomes. CWUR has been publishing annual authoritative global university rankings since 2012.

UAB did slip 42 spots from  #149  in 2017 to #191 in this year’s ranking. Despite the drop, UAB leads all other universities in the state of Alabama by a wide margin.

For 2018, the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa pulled in a #491 global ranking followed by Auburn University #546 and University of Alabama Huntsville #934.

Denny Chimes on the campus of the University of Alabama. Photo by Pat Byington for Bham Now.

Like UAB, all three universities lost ground over the previous year.  In the 2017 Center for World University Rankings University of Alabama Tuscaloosa ranked #387, Auburn University #491 and University of Alabama Huntsville #718.

According to CWUR, the rankings grade universities on seven factors without relying on surveys and university data submissions: quality of teaching, alumni employment, quality of faculty, research output, quality publications, influence, and citations. The methodology has been enhanced this year, with research now accounting for 70% of the total score.

The US leads with 213 universities in the top 1000, followed by China (108), the United Kingdom (62), France (58), and Japan (56). Germany (54), Italy (45), Spain (38), South Korea (35), and Canada (28) round up the top 10 countries. In total, 61 countries have representatives in the top 1000.

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.