Birmingham featured in Washington Post’s “best vacation destinations you’ve never considered” series

Birmingham Alabama

Birmingham Alabama

“With revitalized neighborhoods and a ramped-up food culture, Alabama’s largest city boldly returns to the stage and sings to a bigger audience.” ~ From the Washington Post article titled –  You’re Going Where? Birmingham

Today, one of America’s most prominent national newspapers, the Washington Post, featured the Magic City in its monthly travel series highlighting the “best vacation destinations you’ve probably never considered.”

The comprehensive article was broken into five sections that included places to visit, eat, shop, stay and explore.

Here are the Birmingham treasures the Post recommended to its readers:

Visit

Red Mountain Park, Negro Southern League Museum, Vulcan Park and Museum and Sloss Furnaces

Eat

Ovenbird, Collins Bar, Pizitz Food Hall, Highlands Bar and Grill, and Hot and Hot Fish Club.

Birmingham Alabama
Hot and Hot Fish Club
Shop

Seasick Records, Club Duquette, Charm and The Market at Pepper Place

Birmingham Alabama
Pepper Place in the Lakeview District
Stay

Empire Hotel and Redmont Hotel

Explore

Avondale (and the restaurants) and the Birmingham Civil Rights District

Birmingham Alabama
Entrance to Kelly Ingram Park in the Civil Rights District

What makes locals smile is the knowledge that the article just scratched the surface.

Ford Wiles, chief creative officer of Big Communications summed it up best in the Post article – “I have seen more movement and excitement in the last five years than I have in my entire 20 years here.”

 

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.