Bham Now photographer Larry O. Gay gives us a sneak peak inside “foodie heaven” – The Pizitz Food Hall

Birmingham Alabama

Birmingham Alabama

Described by the New York Times as “foodie heaven,” Bham Now photographer Larry O. Gay visited last weekend, the newly opened Pizitz Food Hall, which has been “rolling out” several of its new vendors over the past few days.

Once it reaches full occupancy, the 20,000 square foot Food Hall on the ground floor of the renovated 1923 Pizitz department store (1821 Second Ave. North),  will include 14 food stalls, two retail shops, and a central bar called The Louis, named after building’s original owner Louis Pizitz.

Want to know what’s inside the Food Hall? Visit the website What to Eat in Birmingham which has become a “go to” site on the Pizitz Food Hall, providing daily updates and reviews on the new food vendors.


Foodie heaven – take a tour with us

Check out below Gay’s first glimpse of “foodie heaven” – The Pizitz Food Hall.  These photos were taken the weekend.  In the coming weeks and months Bham Now will continue to provide updates and photos in and around the new Pizitz Food Hall and building, documenting for our readers this important new development that is enriching the lives of our community and putting Birmingham “on the map” nationally as a culinary paradise.

Birmingham Alabama
Pizitz Food Hall February 2017
Birmingham Alabama
Pizitz Food Hall February 2017
Pizitz Food Hall February 2017
Birmingham Alabama
Pizitz Food Hall February 2017
Birmingham Alabama
Pizitz Food Hall February 2017
Birmingham Alabama
Pizitz Food Hall February 2017
Birmingham Alabama
Pizitz Food Hall February 2017

 

Author: Pat Byington

Longtime conservationist. Former Executive Director at the Alabama Environmental Council and Wild South. Publisher of the Bama Environmental News for more than 18 years. Career highlights include playing an active role in the creation of Alabama's Forever Wild program, Little River Canyon National Preserve, Dugger Mountain Wilderness, preservation of special places throughout the East through the Wilderness Society and the strengthening (making more stringent) the state of Alabama's cancer risk and mercury standards.