This is what I-59/20 could look like! See examples from Atlanta and Dallas. (Part 3/3)

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By Cary Estes

I20/59 lowered proposal
Rendition of lowered I20/59 with park on top

The March of the Millennials has replaced the White Flight of the 1960s and ‘70s. For several decades, urban areas throughout the United States – including Birmingham – steadily lost residential population to the surrounding suburbs. There were a variety of reasons for this, including racial and social issues. But the bottom line was that many downtowns were active only during business hours, with the buildings and streets becoming deserted beginning at 5:01 p.m. each day.

Continue reading “This is what I-59/20 could look like! See examples from Atlanta and Dallas. (Part 3/3)”

Why Should You Care about the I-59/20 Debate?   Birmingham’s Future is at Stake (Part 1 of 3)

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By: Cary Estes

I20/59 ,Birmingham,highway
Courtesy of ALDOT Current interchange westward

It is difficult to bridge economic and social gaps when there is an actual bridge standing in the way. That is the situation Birmingham has been facing for nearly a half-century, ever since Interstate 20/59 was completed near the northern edge of downtown, creating a concrete-and-steel barrier between the central business district, the Birmingham–Jefferson Convention Complex and the nearby neighborhoods of Druid Hills, Fountain Heights, and Norwood.

Continue reading “Why Should You Care about the I-59/20 Debate?   Birmingham’s Future is at Stake (Part 1 of 3)”