What will Alabama look like in 2119? With proper planning it can be a stunning oasis for people, business and wildlife.

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View from Cherokee Rock Village. Photo credit: ADCNR/Robin E. Taylor

In 1819, Alabama was covered with rich forests, prairie, wooded grasslands and canebrake (bamboo). Most of that landscape has been lost.

During the ensuing 200 years, we turned our rivers into lakes, forests into farms and lost and then brought back deer, turkey and the Bald Eagle.

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Red Mountain Park was once a sea of stumps? Explore 200 years of landscape changes in Alabama

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Aerial photo of the what is today Red Mountain Park in the 1900s. Photo courtesy of Red Mountain Park

When I was in the 4th grade, I took my first Alabama history class. Without fail, each day, the teacher outlined Alabama on the chalkboard–the rectangular box with the “high heels” that is Baldwin and Mobile counties. At the end of each class, she would wipe away that outline of the state.

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Train Your Yard to Defeat Drought. You can do it. Yes, you!

By: Bill Finch

Wouldn’t it be great if you could train your yard to be more resistant to drought?

grass watering, puppy, birmingham, drought
Courtesy of Pexels

Expecting our modern lawns and gardens to weather a drought is like expecting a hopeless couch potato to run a marathon. The way we water our yards has actually created weak and breathless plants that can’t survive under normal conditions, much less when things take a turn toward drought.

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Don’t Spray and Pray. How to water.

By: Bill Finch

Trickle down politics may not have helped your pocketbook, but trickle-down watering will make all the difference in how your plants survive this drought.

Dripper hose. Courtesy of Lowes

Trickle-down watering is simple: You simply set the end of your hose on the plant you want to water, and you let the water trickle out, drip, drip, drip. Sort of like a leaky faucet. And it affects your water bill about like a leaky faucet: You’ll barely notice.

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