Alabama weekly nature roundup – November 12 to November 18, 2016

Photo by: Charles Walton - one of our favorite "Supermoon " pics
Photo by: Charles Walton – one of our favorite “Supermoon ” pics

Quote of the week – “I love to think of Nature as wireless telegraph stations through which God speaks to us every day, every hour, and every moment of our lives.” ~ George Washington Carver

The week of the Supermoon.  Drought continues.  Move I-20/59 takes a hit. And the big question – will Alabama ever develop a sustainable water plan?

Looking for something to do this weekend? Become a Preserve Ranger!

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Alabama weekly nature roundup – November 5 to November 11, 2016

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News Stories

Bham Now – Keep Your ‘Butts in Your Seats’ and Other Ways to Help Our Drought

Bham Now – Don’t let the Sink Drip or it could Cost You

Bham Now – Bham Bicycle Paths for the Cycler in You

Bham Now – State Parks Amendment 2 wins in landslide – Yes vote nears 80%

Alabama Forestry Commission – ‘No Burn’ Order Expanded to All Alabama Counties

WBHM –New “Nutritional Labels” For Trails Go Up At Oak Mountain
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Train Your Yard to Defeat Drought. You can do it. Yes, you!

By: Bill Finch

Wouldn’t it be great if you could train your yard to be more resistant to drought?

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Courtesy of Pexels

Expecting our modern lawns and gardens to weather a drought is like expecting a hopeless couch potato to run a marathon. The way we water our yards has actually created weak and breathless plants that can’t survive under normal conditions, much less when things take a turn toward drought.

Continue reading “Train Your Yard to Defeat Drought. You can do it. Yes, you!”

Don’t Spray and Pray. How to water.

By: Bill Finch

Trickle down politics may not have helped your pocketbook, but trickle-down watering will make all the difference in how your plants survive this drought.

Watering Dripper hose Lowes
Dripper hose. Courtesy of Lowes

Trickle-down watering is simple: You simply set the end of your hose on the plant you want to water, and you let the water trickle out, drip, drip, drip. Sort of like a leaky faucet. And it affects your water bill about like a leaky faucet: You’ll barely notice.

Continue reading “Don’t Spray and Pray. How to water.”

Alabama weekly nature roundup – October 29 to November 4, 2016

Moss Rock Festival
Moss Rock Festival this weekend – November 5-6 in Hoover

Once again, this week’s news was dominated by the drought and another pipeline disaster in Shelby County.

In the good news category, there was some progress made on the proposals to create two National Parks in Anniston and Birmingham and on the coast the Alabama Coastal Foundation the launched the state’s first oyster shell recycling program.

Continue reading “Alabama weekly nature roundup – October 29 to November 4, 2016”

Alabama weekly nature roundup – October 22-28, 2016

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The drought continues to grow. State Parks Amendment 2 sparks debate. Anniston and Birmingham inch closer to designating National Parks with a visit from Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell.

And of course, Halloween is fast approaching, so the weekend is filled with wonderfully “scary” events and fundraisers.

A very busy week.

Continue reading “Alabama weekly nature roundup – October 22-28, 2016”

Alabama weekly nature roundup – October 15-21, 2016

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Our top story today and for the coming week is the announcement that Interior Secretary Sally Jewell will be visiting Anniston and Birmingham to hold public hearings on whether to recommend to President Obama several civil rights sites for National Monument designations.

In Birmingham, the proposed park would include landmark sites such as the 16th Street Baptist Church, where in September 1963, four little girls were murdered by a bomb planted by the Ku Klux Klan.  Also included in the proposal,  the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, which houses archives and exhibits documenting the events of the city’s past, and various other historic sites within the civil rights district.

In Anniston, the proposed National Monument designation will focus on sites where the Greyhound bus carrying the Freedom Riders in 1961 were ambushed in downtown Anniston, and outside town where there was an attack on the Freedom Riders and the bus burning that shook a nation took place.

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Continue reading “Alabama weekly nature roundup – October 15-21, 2016”