Civic roundup: Birmingham mayoral debate tonight, Senate runoff approaching

Roy Moore, Luther Strange, Senate, Senator, election, runoff, primary, vote, voting, Republican

Hey, the best way to express your political opinion is to get out there and vote. Here are the details on the statewide Senate runoff and Birmingham’s upcoming mayoral election:

Birmingham, Alabama, mayor, runoff, election, Randall Woodfin, William Bell, graphic

On September 26, Republicans across the state will vote in the Senate primary runoff, while Birmingham city residents will vote in the mayor’s runoff on October 3.

I’ll give you the deets on the mayor’s runoff a little closer to election time. For now, we can educate ourselves on the two contenders for Birmingham’s next mayor, via WVTM’s mayoral debate tonight at 9 PM.

If you’re not able to watch the debates on television, you can live stream them via this web link or this app link.

Roy Moore, Luther Strange, Senate, Senator, election, runoff, primary, vote, voting, Republican
Roy Moore and Luther Strange, via WKRG
September 26: Republican Primary Runoff

Did you vote for a Republican U.S. Senate candidate in the August 15 special primary? If so, you may go to the polls on September 26 and vote in the runoff. Your choices are Roy Moore or Luther Strange, but I’d bet a Milo’s burger and fries with a large half-and-half sweet tea that you already knew that.

The winner of the runoff will face Democrat Doug Jones in the general election on December 12. More on that later.

If you need to find your polling place, check out this link.

Who Can Vote In The Runoff?

If you did not vote in the August 15 primary, but you are registered to vote, you may vote in the Republican runoff on Tuesday. However, because of Alabama state laws, if you voted for a Democrat in the primary, you may not vote in the Republican runoff.

Why Is An Alabama Senate Race Making National Headlines?

This Senate race has national implications, and it highlights the complexities of politics in Alabama (where things get real weird real quick). In case you find yourself needing some background information, here are some recent news stories that explain what led to the runoff. Spoiler alert: This race is a big deal for defining the future of the GOP.

Why A Runoff?

Alabama is having a runoff because no Republican candidate in the August 15 primary election received more than 50 percent of the vote.

I’m not sure what that says about statewide voter turnout, but I’m pretty sure the sentiment is not good. Get out there and vote, Alabama Republicans and previous non voters who are registered! What do you have to lose? A lot, actually.